Increasing Website Traffic and Conversions: How to Use Color Psychology

Nick Brown ,


Colours have a big role in peoples lives, that is a fact. It can dominate our actions and reactions. It can help us find and define identity. It can help us in the process of choice and preference, in the entire complex system of human relations with the outside world.
Proper conversion optimisation, web marketing, website design and advertisement will require a lot of skill and knowledge when choosing a branded colour scheme that will convert and sell effectively.
How does the chosen colour characterise the brand?
Does this colour reflect the whole ecosystem of the brand?
Will this colour convert?
The answers are in the article below.

What is Colour Psychology?

Colour psychology is the science of how colour affects human behaviour. This science is a subdivision of a more global discipline - behavioural psychology. The psychology of colour is a rather difficult subject to study. Some sceptics are dismissive of this discipline, motivating their distrust by the fact that its theories are very difficult to experimentally confirm.
All claims to this area of behavioural psychology cannot be removed simply due to the fact that a sufficient supply of verified scientific data has not yet been created - these are the "growth difficulties" of a relatively young scientific discipline, nothing more.
No one dares to deny the fact that colours have a profound and undeniable effect on human behaviour.
Satyendra Singh, a psychologist at the University of Winnipeg, Canada, in his article Impact of colour on marketing (2006), proves that a potential buyer forms his opinion about a product in just 90 seconds.
Colour plays the dominant role in shaping this decision - it accounts for 62-90% of the overall impression of the product.
To summarise, the psychology of colour is a must-have discipline for marketers, web designers, industrial designers, graphic designers, packaging designers, business leaders, office managers, architects, etc - this science is worth studying even for chefs who are concerned the art of serving cooked dishes, and future parents choosing the colour of the walls of the children's room.

How Does Colour Affect Conversion Rates?

85% of shoppers in control groups for statistical studies on the effect of colour on purchasing decisions stated that product colour was the main reason consumers closed a deal. For online shopping, the value of colour in promoting a physical (non-digital) unique product offer rises to the highest possible values: when buying from an online store, the consumer cannot use additional channels for obtaining information about the product - the digital environment is not yet able to convey any tactile sensations from a cashmere scarf, nor the scent of exquisite perfume. The marketer actually only has colour photographs of the proposed product at his disposal.

An interesting fact: colour as such appeals to the emotions of the consumer so irrefutably powerfully that in 2/3 of cases it completely turns off the critical perception of the offer. 66% of buyers admit that they buy electrical household appliances based on colour, for example, a vacuum cleaner. It would be more logical, of course, to be interested in other characteristics: power consumption, suction power or the level of noise produced during operation.

Advertisements in print media are 26% more likely to be recognised as carriers of a commercial proposal by readers if they are printed in colour (rather than black and white photographs).
The "corporate" colour scheme increases brand recognition by 80%.

More than 90% of purchasing decisions are made by visual factors. The respondents also claim that they subconsciously decide to close the deal within the first 90 seconds from the start of a commercially directed interaction. In 90% of cases, the impression of a product that develops in these minutes and a half is based on colour.

Colours And The Emotions They Generate

In fact, colour, its use in branding, and its emotional impact on the target audience are in a very difficult relationship: for one marketing concept, brown can act as a “sophisticated colour that testifies to good consumer taste” (a campaign to market a new variety of dark chocolate), for the other - as a brutal "masculine colour" associated with the durability of the product (an advertising campaign for boots in the Military style).

However, the most commonly cited associations of colours and emotions - with all the caveats mentioned above - look something like this:

Burgundy is rich and refined.

Green - attracts the attention of environmentally-minded buyers.

Orange - honesty and availability.

Blue (navy, light blue) - trust and reliability (which is why bankers and politicians of the "old school" prefer navy blue suits of the classic cut).

Black - the colour of sophistication, experience, wisdom.

Colours That Require Caution

Of course, there are no “bad colours”: the feelings associated with colours are depending on the context in which they are used. However, some colours have such a wide associative range that they can make an impression on the target audience that the marketer does not want.
Professional web designers from Perth recommend paying special attention to these colours:

Light pink is a very specific colour, strictly targeted for a special audience, consisting of innocence in a certain context takes on a negative meaning - this colour can act as a “colour of weakness”.

Gray is the most neutral, most "empty" colour. It May cause feelings of loneliness and sadness.

Blue / Cyan - Can produce a "cooling impression" by reducing the "consumer enthusiasm" of a prospect.

Black - yes, of course, an exquisite colour, an indicator of aristocratic taste (remember Count Dracula and his wardrobe of the darkest shades). Luxury retailers love to use black in their landing page designs. However, in European colour symbolism, black has traditionally been considered the colour of the Devil, death, mourning and fear. So be careful!

Brown - used in its "pure form" without a competent combination with bright warm colours (red, orange) gives the impression of unbearable boredom.

Conclusion

Colour is the most powerful purchase trigger. It is a "tricky thing." You have to use it right: at the right time, for the right audience, for the right purpose.
Of course, any manipulation of the colour scheme of your landing page or website must be tested in the most scrupulous way: colour is too powerful a marketing influence weapon to be used at random!

Colours have a big role in peoples lives, that is a fact. It can dominate our actions and reactions. It can help us find and define identity. It can help us in the process of choice and preference, in the entire complex system of human relations with the outside world.
Proper conversion optimisation, web marketing, website design and advertisement will require a lot of skill and knowledge when choosing a branded colour scheme that will convert and sell effectively.
How does the chosen colour characterise the brand?
Does this colour reflect the whole ecosystem of the brand?
Will this colour convert?
The answers are in the article below.

What is Colour Psychology?

Colour psychology is the science of how colour affects human behaviour. This science is a subdivision of a more global discipline - behavioural psychology. The psychology of colour is a rather difficult subject to study. Some sceptics are dismissive of this discipline, motivating their distrust by the fact that its theories are very difficult to experimentally confirm.
All claims to this area of behavioural psychology cannot be removed simply due to the fact that a sufficient supply of verified scientific data has not yet been created - these are the "growth difficulties" of a relatively young scientific discipline, nothing more.
No one dares to deny the fact that colours have a profound and undeniable effect on human behaviour.
Satyendra Singh, a psychologist at the University of Winnipeg, Canada, in his article Impact of colour on marketing (2006), proves that a potential buyer forms his opinion about a product in just 90 seconds.
Colour plays the dominant role in shaping this decision - it accounts for 62-90% of the overall impression of the product.
To summarise, the psychology of colour is a must-have discipline for marketers, web designers, industrial designers, graphic designers, packaging designers, business leaders, office managers, architects, etc - this science is worth studying even for chefs who are concerned the art of serving cooked dishes, and future parents choosing the colour of the walls of the children's room.

How Does Colour Affect Conversion Rates?

85% of shoppers in control groups for statistical studies on the effect of colour on purchasing decisions stated that product colour was the main reason consumers closed a deal. For online shopping, the value of colour in promoting a physical (non-digital) unique product offer rises to the highest possible values: when buying from an online store, the consumer cannot use additional channels for obtaining information about the product - the digital environment is not yet able to convey any tactile sensations from a cashmere scarf, nor the scent of exquisite perfume. The marketer actually only has colour photographs of the proposed product at his disposal.

An interesting fact: colour as such appeals to the emotions of the consumer so irrefutably powerfully that in 2/3 of cases it completely turns off the critical perception of the offer. 66% of buyers admit that they buy electrical household appliances based on colour, for example, a vacuum cleaner. It would be more logical, of course, to be interested in other characteristics: power consumption, suction power or the level of noise produced during operation.

Advertisements in print media are 26% more likely to be recognised as carriers of a commercial proposal by readers if they are printed in colour (rather than black and white photographs).
The "corporate" colour scheme increases brand recognition by 80%.

More than 90% of purchasing decisions are made by visual factors. The respondents also claim that they subconsciously decide to close the deal within the first 90 seconds from the start of a commercially directed interaction. In 90% of cases, the impression of a product that develops in these minutes and a half is based on colour.

Colours And The Emotions They Generate

In fact, colour, its use in branding, and its emotional impact on the target audience are in a very difficult relationship: for one marketing concept, brown can act as a “sophisticated colour that testifies to good consumer taste” (a campaign to market a new variety of dark chocolate), for the other - as a brutal "masculine colour" associated with the durability of the product (an advertising campaign for boots in the Military style).

However, the most commonly cited associations of colours and emotions - with all the caveats mentioned above - look something like this:

Burgundy is rich and refined.

Green - attracts the attention of environmentally-minded buyers.

Orange - honesty and availability.

Blue (navy, light blue) - trust and reliability (which is why bankers and politicians of the "old school" prefer navy blue suits of the classic cut).

Black - the colour of sophistication, experience, wisdom.

Colours That Require Caution

Of course, there are no “bad colours”: the feelings associated with colours are depending on the context in which they are used. However, some colours have such a wide associative range that they can make an impression on the target audience that the marketer does not want.
Professional web designers from Perth recommend paying special attention to these colours:

Light pink is a very specific colour, strictly targeted for a special audience, consisting of innocence in a certain context takes on a negative meaning - this colour can act as a “colour of weakness”.

Gray is the most neutral, most "empty" colour. It May cause feelings of loneliness and sadness.

Blue / Cyan - Can produce a "cooling impression" by reducing the "consumer enthusiasm" of a prospect.

Black - yes, of course, an exquisite colour, an indicator of aristocratic taste (remember Count Dracula and his wardrobe of the darkest shades). Luxury retailers love to use black in their landing page designs. However, in European colour symbolism, black has traditionally been considered the colour of the Devil, death, mourning and fear. So be careful!

Brown - used in its "pure form" without a competent combination with bright warm colours (red, orange) gives the impression of unbearable boredom.

Conclusion

Colour is the most powerful purchase trigger. It is a "tricky thing." You have to use it right: at the right time, for the right audience, for the right purpose.
Of course, any manipulation of the colour scheme of your landing page or website must be tested in the most scrupulous way: colour is too powerful a marketing influence weapon to be used at random!

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