7 Landing page strategies that really work

Lilach Bullock on Landing pages,


A landing page is an entry point to your website, and often the very first thing a lead sees.

First impressions count, and it pays to get your landing pages right.

Landing Pages that work

Landing pages are rarely reachable via your main website. Instead users land on them by following a link promising an offer and information.

Landing page strategies are constantly evolving. Yet the goal of every landing page is the same: Converting visitors into customers.

A landing page is the equivalent of a salesperson’s first conversation with a lead – this is your first chance to create a rapport between you and a potential customer. Get it right, and you could win some valuable business, get it wrong, and you may never get a second chance.

Before we begin…

Some things go without saying. Your landing page should be attractive. Though you should be careful to keep the page uncluttered (lots of white space will draw the lead’s eye to your call to action) its design should be consistent with your website.

No matter how well-designed your landing page, without quality images (and/or videos?) and a clear call to action, a landing page is useless.

Here are some great ways to get the most out of your landing pages:

1. First things first- keep it simple

The attention span of your average reader is limited – your customers are busy people, why waste their time?

Keep landing pages simple

Keep the structure of your landing
page
as simple as possible. Most
important of all, ensure that the lead
knows exactly what you want them to
do straight away. Forms, links or
buttons should be immediately
visible. Make sure they don’t
disappear when a lead scrolls down
or clicks through to another page.

2. Cut to the chase

Copy should be clear and
unambiguous – use colloquial
language and steer clear of jargon. Don’t expect users to scroll down for an answer to the
question that brought them to you. For example, if your page addresses a common
computing issue, answer the issue in the first few sentences (if not in the headline itself) and in language any user could understand.

Ideally, a lead should be able to skim your page, and still find their way to the call to action.
A landing page isn’t a book – a user may only spend a few seconds on your page, scanning
it in the hope of finding useful information.

Use bullet-points and short punchy lines of text.

3. Limit choices

Your leads will tell you they love choice. Yet ask the average customer to choose between
two options and they’ll dither. Three or more choices, and they probably won’t bother making their mind up at all. This is known as the paradox of choice – too many options can be confusing.

Sidestep this by limiting the choices available to your leads.

Limit the choices on your landing page to those that have desirable outcomes – for example, give the user the choice between signing up for a free trial or subscribing.

4. Say hello

You know who you are and what you do. Don’t take it for granted that your lead has anything other than a rough idea of what your business does and how your services can benefit them.

Say hello

An introductory landing page is a perfect way of getting newbies up to speed. In addition to a brief overview of your business, provide links to introductory special offers or your best content.

Ask yourself: What do you want new leads to know about you and your business? And what would your visitor like to know about your website?

Keep copy focused on your lead. Address users directly – always use first-person pronouns (‘you’, ‘your’ etc).

Take some time to think through the call to action. Your CTA should be prominent, but not too prominent. Don’t fall into the trap of thinking more buttons means more conversions. Too many buttons may make you seem desperate – and no one wants to buy from a company that seems desperate.

5. Offer users a test drive

Landing pages are perfectly designed for free trials. Sites like Salesforce offer users a 30-
day free test drive, giving leads a chance to get to grips with the site before committing to
subscriptions.

A free trial helps satisfies customers that they’d be able to use your services. The
reassurance this provides helps close sales - by the time a lead comes to convert, they
already know how to use your product.

When it comes to signing up for a trial, make it as easy as possible. There’s no need to
obtain anything other than a name and an email address at this stage. When it comes to
finally sealing the deal, always make sure the final steps are clear and unambiguous - don’t
offer a chance to extend the free trial, simply make it clear that if they want to continue using your product they’ll have to sign up.

6. Use social proof

The concept of social proof originated with the psychologist and marketing guru Dr. Robert Cialdini.

In “Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion.” Cialdini argues that people are more likely to act in a certain way if they observe others performing the same actions. For example, we’re more likely to purchase an item that we’ve seen others buy.

Social proof reassures leads that they are doing the right thing in committing to your product.

Use quotes

On a landing page, social proof can take the form of written testimonials (“X are a fantastic company. Working with them has changed how we do business” – Matt, St Albans). Alternatively, you can offer users real time social proof, in the form of an app like Proof. Proof gives visitors to your landing page a running update of orders, detailing buyers’ names, locations and the item/service they purchased.

Not only does real time social proof reassure leads that other people are using your services, it demonstrates that they’re not the only people on your site.

Even better, if you’ve worked with big names, display their logos. It’s great that Dave from Basingstoke bought something from you. It’s even more better that a large firm trusts you enough to work with you. Let leads know about your big clients – display the logos of businesses that you’ve worked with (with their permission, of course).

7. And finally, remember to say thank you

Everything’s gone according to plan. Your lead has followed the call to action and is on their way along the sales funnel (if they haven’t already finalised).

This is the time to send a simple thank you. Your thank you can be in the form of an email, or a link to another landing page. Whatever form it takes, the thank you will reinforcing their decision to convert.

Not only is it just good form, a thank you email gives customers a sense of closure, and reassures them that their business is valued.

A landing page is an entry point to your website, and often the very first thing a lead sees.

First impressions count, and it pays to get your landing pages right.

Landing Pages that work

Landing pages are rarely reachable via your main website. Instead users land on them by following a link promising an offer and information.

Landing page strategies are constantly evolving. Yet the goal of every landing page is the same: Converting visitors into customers.

A landing page is the equivalent of a salesperson’s first conversation with a lead – this is your first chance to create a rapport between you and a potential customer. Get it right, and you could win some valuable business, get it wrong, and you may never get a second chance.

Before we begin…

Some things go without saying. Your landing page should be attractive. Though you should be careful to keep the page uncluttered (lots of white space will draw the lead’s eye to your call to action) its design should be consistent with your website.

No matter how well-designed your landing page, without quality images (and/or videos?) and a clear call to action, a landing page is useless.

Here are some great ways to get the most out of your landing pages:

1. First things first- keep it simple

The attention span of your average reader is limited – your customers are busy people, why waste their time?

Keep landing pages simple

Keep the structure of your landing
page
as simple as possible. Most
important of all, ensure that the lead
knows exactly what you want them to
do straight away. Forms, links or
buttons should be immediately
visible. Make sure they don’t
disappear when a lead scrolls down
or clicks through to another page.

2. Cut to the chase

Copy should be clear and
unambiguous – use colloquial
language and steer clear of jargon. Don’t expect users to scroll down for an answer to the
question that brought them to you. For example, if your page addresses a common
computing issue, answer the issue in the first few sentences (if not in the headline itself) and in language any user could understand.

Ideally, a lead should be able to skim your page, and still find their way to the call to action.
A landing page isn’t a book – a user may only spend a few seconds on your page, scanning
it in the hope of finding useful information.

Use bullet-points and short punchy lines of text.

3. Limit choices

Your leads will tell you they love choice. Yet ask the average customer to choose between
two options and they’ll dither. Three or more choices, and they probably won’t bother making their mind up at all. This is known as the paradox of choice – too many options can be confusing.

Sidestep this by limiting the choices available to your leads.

Limit the choices on your landing page to those that have desirable outcomes – for example, give the user the choice between signing up for a free trial or subscribing.

4. Say hello

You know who you are and what you do. Don’t take it for granted that your lead has anything other than a rough idea of what your business does and how your services can benefit them.

Say hello

An introductory landing page is a perfect way of getting newbies up to speed. In addition to a brief overview of your business, provide links to introductory special offers or your best content.

Ask yourself: What do you want new leads to know about you and your business? And what would your visitor like to know about your website?

Keep copy focused on your lead. Address users directly – always use first-person pronouns (‘you’, ‘your’ etc).

Take some time to think through the call to action. Your CTA should be prominent, but not too prominent. Don’t fall into the trap of thinking more buttons means more conversions. Too many buttons may make you seem desperate – and no one wants to buy from a company that seems desperate.

5. Offer users a test drive

Landing pages are perfectly designed for free trials. Sites like Salesforce offer users a 30-
day free test drive, giving leads a chance to get to grips with the site before committing to
subscriptions.

A free trial helps satisfies customers that they’d be able to use your services. The
reassurance this provides helps close sales - by the time a lead comes to convert, they
already know how to use your product.

When it comes to signing up for a trial, make it as easy as possible. There’s no need to
obtain anything other than a name and an email address at this stage. When it comes to
finally sealing the deal, always make sure the final steps are clear and unambiguous - don’t
offer a chance to extend the free trial, simply make it clear that if they want to continue using your product they’ll have to sign up.

6. Use social proof

The concept of social proof originated with the psychologist and marketing guru Dr. Robert Cialdini.

In “Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion.” Cialdini argues that people are more likely to act in a certain way if they observe others performing the same actions. For example, we’re more likely to purchase an item that we’ve seen others buy.

Social proof reassures leads that they are doing the right thing in committing to your product.

Use quotes

On a landing page, social proof can take the form of written testimonials (“X are a fantastic company. Working with them has changed how we do business” – Matt, St Albans). Alternatively, you can offer users real time social proof, in the form of an app like Proof. Proof gives visitors to your landing page a running update of orders, detailing buyers’ names, locations and the item/service they purchased.

Not only does real time social proof reassure leads that other people are using your services, it demonstrates that they’re not the only people on your site.

Even better, if you’ve worked with big names, display their logos. It’s great that Dave from Basingstoke bought something from you. It’s even more better that a large firm trusts you enough to work with you. Let leads know about your big clients – display the logos of businesses that you’ve worked with (with their permission, of course).

7. And finally, remember to say thank you

Everything’s gone according to plan. Your lead has followed the call to action and is on their way along the sales funnel (if they haven’t already finalised).

This is the time to send a simple thank you. Your thank you can be in the form of an email, or a link to another landing page. Whatever form it takes, the thank you will reinforcing their decision to convert.

Not only is it just good form, a thank you email gives customers a sense of closure, and reassures them that their business is valued.

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Lilach Bullock
Professional Speaker, Lead Conversion Expert, Social Media Specialist & Occasional Diva. Proud mum
UK https://www.lilachbullock.com/