4 Creative Marketing Ideas To Boost Your Business

Nick Brown ,


Optimizing Profit Through Strategic Marketing

Marketing is complex, but it’s also straightforward — just like most modern technology. You’re reading this on a smartphone or other IoT device right now; unless of course, you’re browsing on a traditional laptop or desktop. The act of reading is relatively straightforward, as is the act of navigating the “desktop” or “home screen” of your device.
Even so, could you design a computer? Could you program that computer? Some reading this have that ability, most don’t, and it’s just the same with marketing. Becoming visible is a simple matter. Monetizing that visibility to produce consistent Return On Investment (ROI) is not so straightforward. How do you get from point A to point B?
In this writing, we’ll briefly explore four creative marketing ideas to help boost your business in this way. Some of these you’ll be able to do on your own internally, while others will likely require a little additional help.

1. Lean Into Organic PR As It’s Possible To

For solid marketing PR, it’s very important to consider where there are opportunities in your community. If you’re a medical practice, attending a health fair can be fine organic marketing. This is especially true if you provide something like free eye exams at the professional level—certain jobs in certain communities require that sort of medical examination prior to hiring.
So you might contact local news outlets and appraise them as to what you’ll be provided at an upcoming health fair. If you’re not in medicine, rent a kiosk at the “regular” fair for your city, state, or county. Should neither of these alternatives work, consider providing the services of your business free of charge to an organization relying on charity.
Maybe a tech company installs a network for a local school district—just be sure to contact the media so you get a free story. Learn how to issue effective press releases.

2. Local Radio Stations, Billboards, And Print Magazines

There are generally going to be radio hosts who have talk shows in your community. Call their office and ask for an interview; they’re likely looking for one or two slots to fill. The key is to present yourself as a local with a perspective, and one that is core to a given issue facing your community. Radio hosts generally won’t let some random person just call in.
However, depending on the size of your community, this could be a possibility. If your town is 30,000 or less in terms of population, your local talk radio DJ may not have much of a choice. Also, it’s worth noting that antiquated radio marketing isn’t the only “old school” outreach method that is still effective today.
Billboards of an analog and digital variety are available.
Digital billboards tend to cost between $200 and $1,000 a week, depending on the community, but they do reach people. Print magazines have a similar effect; especially if they’re a deliberate periodical designed for advertising local sales.

3. Work With A Full-Service Marketing Agency

It’s also a good idea to explore the sort of marketing strategy which can only come from a professional agency providing such services. A lot of marketing today involves the internet. Online videos via YouTube, infographics and general written content all have their place. SEO stands for Search Engine Optimization, PPC stands for Pay Per Click.
Between SEO, PPC, social media, and visual stimuli, there’s a lot that can be done online to stimulate visibility in an organic way. Proper keyword use and content creation can funnel traffic to the website of your business.
Increased traffic tends to result in an increase in conversions to your products or services overall. You can directly track digital outreach effectiveness.

4. Co-Opting The Social Media Profiles Of Employees

How many employees are you working with? If you’ve got more than five, co-opting their social media can be a good idea — just take associated best practices into account. At a minimum, you can expect someone to have about 300 contacts on their Facebook.
For fifteen employees, you should be able to expect a reach of, at minimum, 1,500; of which probably 15 or more individuals represent your demographic. Some individuals have much larger social media accounts and will reach many more people.
The upper limit on Facebook friends is 5,000. If you’ve got an employee with a maxed-out account, and only 1% of their 5,000 FB friends are in your demographic locally, that’s 50 customers. So, provided it’s doable, co-opt employee social media. A good way to do that is to avoid limiting them or policing them.
Keep in mind, people are going to have issues politically, socially, and ideologically. Ignore all that. For the most part, you’re contending with a “hurricane in a teacup”, as the saying goes; controversy stimulates visibility, also. That said, don’t push things too far—if using the social media of employees would be improper for your business, then don’t use their social media.

Seeing ROI On Your Marketing Investment

Co-opting social media, working with a full-service marketing agency, utilizing local radio, local billboards, and local print, and organic PR all have their place in outreach. These methods may or may not work for you, so lastly: seek a marketing consultant to assure whatever efforts you’re pursuing are worthwhile.

Optimizing Profit Through Strategic Marketing

Marketing is complex, but it’s also straightforward — just like most modern technology. You’re reading this on a smartphone or other IoT device right now; unless of course, you’re browsing on a traditional laptop or desktop. The act of reading is relatively straightforward, as is the act of navigating the “desktop” or “home screen” of your device.
Even so, could you design a computer? Could you program that computer? Some reading this have that ability, most don’t, and it’s just the same with marketing. Becoming visible is a simple matter. Monetizing that visibility to produce consistent Return On Investment (ROI) is not so straightforward. How do you get from point A to point B?
In this writing, we’ll briefly explore four creative marketing ideas to help boost your business in this way. Some of these you’ll be able to do on your own internally, while others will likely require a little additional help.

1. Lean Into Organic PR As It’s Possible To

For solid marketing PR, it’s very important to consider where there are opportunities in your community. If you’re a medical practice, attending a health fair can be fine organic marketing. This is especially true if you provide something like free eye exams at the professional level—certain jobs in certain communities require that sort of medical examination prior to hiring.
So you might contact local news outlets and appraise them as to what you’ll be provided at an upcoming health fair. If you’re not in medicine, rent a kiosk at the “regular” fair for your city, state, or county. Should neither of these alternatives work, consider providing the services of your business free of charge to an organization relying on charity.
Maybe a tech company installs a network for a local school district—just be sure to contact the media so you get a free story. Learn how to issue effective press releases.

2. Local Radio Stations, Billboards, And Print Magazines

There are generally going to be radio hosts who have talk shows in your community. Call their office and ask for an interview; they’re likely looking for one or two slots to fill. The key is to present yourself as a local with a perspective, and one that is core to a given issue facing your community. Radio hosts generally won’t let some random person just call in.
However, depending on the size of your community, this could be a possibility. If your town is 30,000 or less in terms of population, your local talk radio DJ may not have much of a choice. Also, it’s worth noting that antiquated radio marketing isn’t the only “old school” outreach method that is still effective today.
Billboards of an analog and digital variety are available.
Digital billboards tend to cost between $200 and $1,000 a week, depending on the community, but they do reach people. Print magazines have a similar effect; especially if they’re a deliberate periodical designed for advertising local sales.

3. Work With A Full-Service Marketing Agency

It’s also a good idea to explore the sort of marketing strategy which can only come from a professional agency providing such services. A lot of marketing today involves the internet. Online videos via YouTube, infographics and general written content all have their place. SEO stands for Search Engine Optimization, PPC stands for Pay Per Click.
Between SEO, PPC, social media, and visual stimuli, there’s a lot that can be done online to stimulate visibility in an organic way. Proper keyword use and content creation can funnel traffic to the website of your business.
Increased traffic tends to result in an increase in conversions to your products or services overall. You can directly track digital outreach effectiveness.

4. Co-Opting The Social Media Profiles Of Employees

How many employees are you working with? If you’ve got more than five, co-opting their social media can be a good idea — just take associated best practices into account. At a minimum, you can expect someone to have about 300 contacts on their Facebook.
For fifteen employees, you should be able to expect a reach of, at minimum, 1,500; of which probably 15 or more individuals represent your demographic. Some individuals have much larger social media accounts and will reach many more people.
The upper limit on Facebook friends is 5,000. If you’ve got an employee with a maxed-out account, and only 1% of their 5,000 FB friends are in your demographic locally, that’s 50 customers. So, provided it’s doable, co-opt employee social media. A good way to do that is to avoid limiting them or policing them.
Keep in mind, people are going to have issues politically, socially, and ideologically. Ignore all that. For the most part, you’re contending with a “hurricane in a teacup”, as the saying goes; controversy stimulates visibility, also. That said, don’t push things too far—if using the social media of employees would be improper for your business, then don’t use their social media.

Seeing ROI On Your Marketing Investment

Co-opting social media, working with a full-service marketing agency, utilizing local radio, local billboards, and local print, and organic PR all have their place in outreach. These methods may or may not work for you, so lastly: seek a marketing consultant to assure whatever efforts you’re pursuing are worthwhile.

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